Dr. Tom Love

Tom Love got his start in the software business as a programmer for General Electric Company during the days of structured programming, software complexity metrics and early Unix systems. He expanded his knowledge of global, real time systems at ITT Corporation where he directed all worldwide software research projects. In 1982, his group at ITT built the first object-oriented extension to C language and did pioneering work in collaboration systems to support distributed teams of developers.

After spending five years consulting, Tom joined IBM Consulting and created the Object Technology Group – a high visibility application development organization that did major projects for companies such as Ralston, USAA, AT&T, American Express and Chubb Insurance. Based upon this success, he was “acquired by” Morgan Stanley to lead a consolidation of IT resources into a single corporate group. There he learned how to develop applications in 24 hours by doing round the world development (London, NY and Tokyo) when there is real money on the line.  From Morgan Stanley, Tom was a founder and CEO of Worldstreet Corporation — a startup company that developed an integrated news, trading, and risk management system targeted at emerging markets. This company was acquired by Thomson Financial.

In 1997 Tom teamed up with Dr. John Wooten to found ShouldersCorp. The company is a professional services firm with customers such as DoD, Dept. Of Veterans Affairs, DHS, CACI, Lockheed Martin, ADP, Sungard, ABB, CSC, UNISYS, World Travel Partners, Sun Chemical, Intertech, Hologix, Saqqara and PriceWaterhouseCoopers. The HR-Payroll system developed for ADP is the largest known commercial agile development project.

At ShouldersCorp Tom has led eight 100 day agile development projects – all delivered on time, on spec, and on budget. He is currently involved in helping the VA plan, design, and manage the reengineering of VistA, their Electronic Medical Record system.

Tom has a Ph.D. in Cognitive Science from the University of Washington. His dissertation was a study of the characteristics of successful computer programmers. Many early project experiences are recorded in his 1993 book, Object Lessons, published by Cambridge University Press. He also serves on the prestigious Board of Visitors for Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute.

Tom and his wife of 42 years consider their three daughters, all of whom hold MBAs from the Harvard Business School, as their greatest achievement.